By Danielle Chavira

DENVER (CBS4) – The Denver Department of Public Health and Environment wants residents and pet owners to know about potentially deadly blue-green algae at Sloan Lake. Health experts posted signs around the park warning the public.

A walker takes advantage of the pathway around the lake at Sloan's Lake Park on April 8, 2020 in Denver. Sloan's Lake Park is home to the biggest lake in Denver and is the city’s second largest park. While many of the amenities are closed due to the COVID-19 crisis, the park remains open.

A walker takes advantage of the pathway around the lake at Sloan’s Lake Park on April 8, 2020 in Denver. Sloan’s Lake Park is home to the biggest lake in Denver and is the city’s second largest park. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

Pet owners should not let their dogs, cats or other pets drink from the water. The cyanobacteria can be poisonous to animals and humans, or it could cause neurological problems.

If your pet comes into contact with it, you’re urged to wash your pet with fresh, clean water. Symptoms like vomiting, weakness or weakness typically show between 15 minutes or several days.

The algae typically develops in warm temperatures. City health experts expect the algae to remain for another month or until temperatures cool.

Danielle Chavira