By Jamie Leary

DENVER (CBS4) – Mayor Michael Hancock isn’t rushing his decision on whether to lift Denver’s ban on pit bulls. On Thursday, those who’d like to keep it in place submitted more than 100 signatures to let him know.

“We are very very threatened by the possibility of this ban being lifted. Just yesterday we witnessed two pit bulls in our community of Montbello, just strolling and roaming freely,” said Pam Jiner.

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Pam Jiner

Pam Jiner (credit: CBS)

Despite the fact that pit bulls have been outlawed in Denver since the 1980s, Jiner says there are hundreds in Montbello.

Jina worries if the ban is lifted, it will mean even more irresponsible owners.

“Pit bulls attack the fences, they’ve eaten holes in the fences some of ’em can jump so high that you see the head,” she said.

(credit: CBS)

It already makes her nervous walking around her neighborhood. She worries if the ban is lifted, not only will she not be able to enjoy her walks, she says it marginalizes a community already struggling to maintain the current law.

“My community’s health is more important to me than a pit bull’s freedom to roam.”

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The change would allow pit pulls in Denver under specific licensing requirements, including the dog must be micro-chipped, vaccinated and spayed and neutered. It would also limit the number of pit bulls per household to two and owners would have to notify animal protection if the dog escapes or bites.

(credit: Xavier ROSSI/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

Hancock spoke to CBS4 Thursday ahead of the decision. While he has never vetoed a vote by the city council, that doesn’t mean he can’t.

“This is a very important decision to make and I want to make sure I’m thoughtful about it,” he said.

Mike Strott, Deputy Director for Mayor Hancock’s Office, told CBS4 Thursday that Hancock has five days from receipt of ordinance to either sign or veto; that would be early Sunday morning.

If he does not sign or veto, then the ordinance becomes law without a signature.

The Friday deadline is to ensure council has enough time to update their agenda if the mayor were to decide to veto. Nine council members would need to vote to override the Mayor’s veto.

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Council will meet Tuesday because of the holiday on Monday.

Jamie Leary