By Makenzie O’Keefe

DENVER (CBS4) – Drivers in Denver may want to watch their speed around town. The city is adding more red light cameras and another photo radar van after the Denver City Council approved a contract with the city’s Traffic Enforcement Division.

red light cameras Denver To Add More Red Light Cameras, Photo Radar Van

(credit: CBS)

Currently, red light cameras can be found at four different intersections in Denver.

“We’ve cut down violations by approximately 60 percent since we’ve had those, so we feel like it is beneficial,” explained Sonny Jackson, spokesman for the Denver Police Department.

A pending contract will expand this program. Denver police said they will be adding new red light cameras to two intersections, and moving an existing camera to a new intersection. That means drivers will soon find this technology at three intersections: Santa Fe and Alameda, 18th and Lincoln and 13th and Lincoln.

intersection Denver To Add More Red Light Cameras, Photo Radar Van

13th and Lincoln (credit: CBS)

These intersections are considered to be fairly dangerous for drivers.

“They studied them to see where we can really change behavior, where accidents and things are happening, and where we need people to be more conscious about what they are doing,” Jackson said.

An additional photo radar van will also be added to monitor speed limits on city streets.

While these cameras and vans are not well liked by drivers, police say the goal is to reduce side-impact crashes and to change the behavior of drivers.

photo radar Denver To Add More Red Light Cameras, Photo Radar Van

(credit: CBS)

“We find people are aware that those intersections are there and they slow down, they take their time, they don’t push the lights,” Jackson said. “It makes you think of what you’re doing.”

Jackson said they don’t have a timeline on when the new technology will be installed. It will be mobile however, which will make installation easier and allow the department to move cameras to other areas in the future if needed.

Makenzie O’Keefe joined the CBS4 team as a reporter in 2017. Read her bio, connect with her on Facebook, follow her on Twitter at @makenziepokeefe or email her your story ideas.

Comments (3)
  1. Robert Chase says:

    Unbelievable! Denver needs to assign many more police officers (not cameras) to traffic enforcement. Denver generally does not enforce State traffic laws within the City — the motorcycle gang periodically tickets drivers under local ordinance for passing (a single) intersection in the right lane on Broadway and Lincoln, but that is for the purpose of revenue generation as opposed to public safety. The City’s leadership is well nigh on clueless; Denver needs to resume enforcing State laws pertaining to the right of way in order to stem the rising toll of deaths and serious injuries to cyclists and pedestrians.

  2. James Walker says:

    Denver is addicted to the loot collected from the for-profit speed and red light camera rackets. The state legislature wanted to pass severe restrictions or outright bans on the use of these for-profit rackets that target mostly safe drivers, but former Governor Hickenlooper was “in the pockets” of the for-profit ticket camera racket companies and vetoed these proper changes.

    Many states make speed and/or red light cameras illegal and they should be illegal in every state. These rackets produce profits above the high camera costs that are the true goal for the cameras ONLY when the posted speed limits and traffic lights are maliciously and deliberately mis-engineered to ticket mostly safe drivers. But ticketing safe drivers for profits is a total perversion of the purpose for traffic enforcement, a perversion that no one should tolerate.

    James C. Walker, National Motorists Association

  3. And you just know if violations were up the idiots with unlimited power and no control would be spouting, well we just need more cameras for additional taxation in the name of fines.

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