ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK, Colo. (AP) — The Latest on an Illinois hiker who went missing in Rocky Mountain National Park (all times local):
5:50 p.m.
Searchers have found what is believed to be the body of an Illinois man who went missing in Rocky Mountain National Park.Park officials say the body was found Friday morning west of Keplinger’s Couloir at 12,600 feet (3,840 meters) of elevation in extremely steep, rugged terrain. It’s believed to be that of 60-year-old Jens “Jay” Yambert, of Urbana, Illinois.Because of poor weather and erratic winds, rangers plan to spend the night in the area and recover the body Saturday.

Yambert was reported overdue Tuesday when he didn’t return from the hike he began on Sunday afternoon. His rental car was found at the Longs Peak Trailhead.

jens jay yambert Searchers Find Body Thought To Be Hiker Missing In Rocky Mountain National Park

Jens Yambert (credit: Rocky Mountain National Park)

At 14,259 feet (4,346 meters) above sea level, Longs Peak is the highest mountain in the park and the 15th highest in Colorado.

___

10:10 a.m.

Rangers are looking for an Illinois man who didn’t return from a hike in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Rangers learned on Tuesday that Jens “Jay” Yambert, 60, of Urbana, Illinois, was overdue to return from the hike he began on Sunday afternoon. According to officials, Yambert’s rental car was found at the Longs Peak Trailhead.

Rangers have searched by foot. A forest service helicopter crew also searched the area.

At 14,259 feet (4346.14 meters), Longs Peak is the highest mountain in the park and the 15th highest in Colorado.

A 23-year-old woman from Texas was found on Thursday morning, after being reported missing in the Longs Peak area. Park officials reported that Emma Long of Houston was flown to a Denver hospital for treatment of serious injuries from a fall.

(© Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Comments (2)
  1. Robert Chase says:

    Back in Illinois, the detail that he set out at 2PM seems to have been omitted from news reports; you have omitted that Jens Yambert had to be rescued off Longs Peak four years ago. Do some journalism — find out whether he had a headlamp.

  2. Robert Chase says:

    From other reports, it seems that Dr. Yambert set out to climb Longs Peak absurdly late in the day, along the Keyhole route — the hikers who saw him there might have tried to dissuade him from continuing. He may well have been running out of light by the time he reached the Homestretch, but he apparently headed down Keplinger’s Couloir, straying from the route into even steeper terrain just west of it, falling, and dying. It’s not just the threat of lightning that militates for starting at 2AM instead of 2PM; setting out in the dark affords more time in the full light of day for finding the route on the mountain itself. The signs at the Longs Peak trailhead may need to be revamped to warn enthusiasts off of attempting to summit Longs in an afternoon.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s