Drug Raid Takes Place At Wrong Home

MESA COUNTY, Colo. (CBS4)– The Mesa County Sheriff has apologized to a family for an early morning drug raid on their home which included busting windows and breaking into the home.

The Grand Junction Police Department received information about a large amount of methamphetamine at a home in Clifton early Wednesday morning. The person who called police told them about the large amount of drugs in the home, where the drugs were located and also about firearms in the home. That person gave officers the address of the home where all this was occurring.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

Officers with Grand Junction police, deputies with the Mesa County Sheriff’s Office and the Western Colorado Drug Task Force waited for a search warrant.

When officers arrived at the home, there was no answer and they forced entry into the home, breaking several windows in the process.

Once inside officers realized the residents were not the suspects they were looking for. Further investigation revealed that the suspects named by the person who called police once lived at the address but had since moved.

Now, a family with several children lives in the home. Two adults and five children between the ages of 3 and 12 live there.

The sheriff apologized to the family and explained to them, including the children, what happened and how the mistake was made. The sheriff’s office has replaced the windows, repaired the front door and will install new carpet.

The sheriff also said officers will evaluate what happened and how to prevent such a mistake from happening again. The sheriff also said that they are grateful that no one was hurt in the raid.

On the Mesa County Sheriff’s website, they included this statement: “We are committed to being transparent in our operations, and that includes the bad, as well as the good. We appreciate the support and encouragement we receive from our community, and we remain dedicated to being worthy of your trust.”

Comments

One Comment

  1. Mike Walker says:

    Maybe if the police were not so lazy and actually did some investigative police work instead of just playing army and trashing the house. SWAT = lazy cops with no intelligence!!!! Hopefully someday cops do this to the wrong house and someone kills all the cops dead, like legally they could, as they feared for their lives from an armed invasion. Maybe if there is a pile of dead cops, they might reconsider their lazy and violent tactics!

  2. Warren Fahy says:

    End the drug war. (And nobody will be making meth – just like nobody makes bathtub gin anymore.)

  3. At least they apologized and cleaned up the mess they made.

  4. temp says:

    What happens when they kick the door in, people believe they are being attacked and defend themselves? What happens when the police injure or kill innocent people? What happens if the homeowner is armed and competent and injures or kills a police officer(s)? Very little work on the part of the police could have mitigated the potential for disaster. All too often it appears that the departments who fall into this type of behavior are too gung-ho to make something happen and they forget to do the required legwork. BTW: I am a big supporter of law enforcement and our men in blue. I attend church with more than a few sheriff deputies and greatly respect them. I am not a supporter of incompetence or poor work that leads to tradgedy.

    1. sundownkid1024 says:

      It’s happened to many times in TENNESSEE and in one case a man was shot and killed,The terror these poor Tennesseans went through only brought laughter from police who acted more the three stooges than police,I see nothing funny in police raiding the wrong house and terrifying innocent people but I am not a Tennessee police officer I try to do the right thing and have a conscious,

  5. Dale Tipton says:

    Now THAT’S how responsible adults deal with their mistakes. However there should be a higher standard for the judge to issue a search warrant than “an anonymous phone call” before jackbooted Nazi storm-troopers are released on the public.

  6. Now what if that home-owner had come out guns blazing?

  7. Jerry Payton says:

    I served on a jury in Grand Junction, same thing, cops broke in, smashed everything then left it open for neighbors to loot. Too much military tactic training, not enough human interaction appropriate training.

  8. Steven Bell says:

    Just another day in America’s idiotic “war on drugs.” How many times have similar things happened in this country? Hundreds? Thousands?

  9. AT LEASE the cops seem to have done the right thing here. I remember a similar indecent I think in AZ where the cops tossed in a flashbang and permanently injured/disabled a child. They had to fight to get the cops to apologize (if they ever did) and pay for the medical for this poor child and help the family deal with this.

  10. The war on drugs is one more republican fiasco. Like no child left behind but instead of creating a generation of idiots. They put millions of poor behind bars for llfe.

    1. Observations99 says:

      Bruce Steinberg, you’re myopia is only matched by your ignorance.

  11. Bill says:

    Let’s see… The charges should be disturbing-the-peace, breaking-and-entering, damage-to-property, reckless-endangerment, and hiring-morons-and giving-them-guns.

  12. Mikey says:

    There you have it? Want to settle a grudge? Just call in an anonymous tip and the cops will take care of it. The officer that applied for the warrant needs to be dismissed with prejudice and the judge that issued it on such shaky standards–there is absolutely no reason to believe that an anonymous tip is truthful–needs to be disbarred.

    1. It doesn’t say anywhere that the tip was anonymous. Police are able to get a warrant when info comes from a reliable informant. Maybe the tip came form someone who was reliable in the past. I do feel, however, that they should have done some follow-up investigating to confirm the tip first. That could’ve been as easy as sitting on the house for a few hours to see who is coming and going. Or checking with a landlord or register of deeds to see if the place was still occupied by the real suspects. But that is too much to ask when you have people gung-ho to raid a house.

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