cbs4

Local

Easter Service Marks Colorado Massacre Centennial

View Comments
An image from the Ludlow Massacre (credit: umwa.org)

An image from the Ludlow Massacre (credit: umwa.org)

TRINIDAD, Colo. (AP) – Linda Linville climbed down the steep stone steps into the dugout on the southern Colorado prairie Sunday where one branch of her family was wiped out in one day 100 years ago.

Her great aunt, her unborn baby and two children died in a fire that broke out during a battle between coal miners striking against John D. Rockefeller, Jr. and the Colorado National Guard in what became known as the Ludlow Massacre. Twenty-seven-year-old Cedilena Costa, 4-year-old Lucy and 6-year-old Onofrio suffocated from the smoke as they hid below ground to escape the battle. Linville said Cedilena’s husband, Charlie Costa, was captured and shot in the head that day and never knew his family’s fate.

“Anyone who says they died in vain is wrong,” said Linville, a retired history teacher from Corona, Calif., referring to the fact that the miners eventually ended up going back to work without winning any of their demands.

The massacre and battle left 21 people dead, including the Greek-American union leader Louis Tikas, and set off 10 days of civil war in which the miners killed 30 mine guards, supervisors and strikebreakers. They surrendered only after President Woodrow Wilson sent federal troops to the state.

The deaths drew national attention to the long running strike and forced Rockefeller to take a public role in Colorado Fuel & Iron. He instituted a company union and grievance system, which the miners later rejected when the won a right to unionize on their own during the New Deal. The massacre and the deadly Triangle Shirtwaist fire in 1911 are credited with the helping win the eventual passage of the 1935 National Labor Relations Act.

Linville and more than 100 others – including members of the United Mine Workers of America wearing the red bandanas the strikers wore – gathered at the site of the former Ludlow tent colony to mark the massacre’s 100th anniversary with a Greek Orthodox Easter service. It was very similar to the one the miners, who came from a variety of countries, shared in 100 years ago with the Greek strikers the day before the massacre. In a coincidental reminder of Ludlow’s international community, the Easter service included the traditional reading of the Gospel story in many languages to symbolize the universality of its message.

The service was low-key, with participants seated on folding chairs and wooden picnic tables underneath a pavilion near the railroad tracks. No statewide elected officials attended.

Just yards away from the memorial to the miners and dugout, the crowd held candles and listened and repeated the liturgy focusing on joy over Christ’s resurrection.

- By Colleen Slevin, AP Writer

(© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

More Ludlow Massacren Stories

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,391 other followers