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Memorial Day Confederate Flag Stirs Concerns

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) – A decision by veterans to place a Confederate flag on graves of veterans buried at Steamboat Springs Cemetery is stirring concerns.

Confederate States of America flags have been placed for years on the graves of Civil War veterans buried at Hayden Cemetery.

U.S. Air Force veteran and longtime Hayden resident Sam Haslem said it’s never caused friction before.

This year the ceremony has raised the profile of an issue that long has sparked protests across the South, bringing it to the attention of civil rights movements, Steamboat Today reports.

The president of the Colorado Springs chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Rosemary Lytle, says Steamboat Springs should not deface itself with the ugliness of segregation and separatism as shown through the Confederate flag.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

Comments

One Comment

  1. Ruth Bowman says:

    Please remember: Lincoln had “Dixie” played for the Washington crowds on the day of surrender. I doubt he meant for it to be for the last time, and not from appeasement, but from compassion. The flags may be considered, by one’s personal choice, simple continuing acts of respect for these particular dead…or not. But such a personal choice can be kept to oneself and not swayed by any group’s agenda.

  2. Nought says:

    Why does’t the NAACP counter by putting American flags on the 300,000 of Union White soldiers who died in the process of eliminating slavery. Or maybe SAY which Negro/Black history group has ever done so in the last 50 Years.

  3. vernon ferguson says:

    Please Don’t forget the almost 60,000 Black Confederate Who served Their Country
    The Confederate States of America

  4. Rollo says:

    Memorial Day, originally known as Declaration Day, was first celebrated on May 30, 1868 in honor of Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. National Commander of the Grand Army of the Republic General John Logan first observed the holiday by placing flowers on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. You see, those who whine and worry about confederate flags should be ignored as nothing more than uneducated dolts and/or trouble makers.

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