If you’re new to Colorado, you might find the gardening a bit difficult considering the climate and soil. Not to worry though, because Denver and cities all around the state are happy to provide small plots of land for you to try your hand at gardening. Whether you want to plant vegetables, flowers, fruit or something completely out of the blue, you can contact your local community garden to do just that. Novice and master gardeners gets their hands dirty side by side, most often through the Denver Urban Gardens network, but many community farms and plots are popping up as well — give it a chance!
Samuels Elementary School Community Garden
3985 S Vincennes Court
Denver, CO 80237
(720) 424-4450
dug.org

Samuels Elementary is a school with diverse students, home to the Eagles and serving Southeast Denver. The school is dedicated to providing their students with the best education, preparing them with a core curriculum. One of the things that adds to their popularity is the community garden that they run — what better way to teach little ones about the environment and the world around them than through tending their own garden? You and your child will both enjoy seeing what sprouts from that tiny seed.

Denver Botanic Gardens Community Garden
3365 E. 9th Ave
Denver, CO 80206
(303) 419-8705
www.botanicgardenscommunitygarden.org

You’ve been to the Botanic Gardens and you know you love it there. But did you know you could be a part of it, too? Join the community garden, just a couple blocks across the park from the Denver Botanic Gardens. The community garden is a fun place to hang out: there are “fruit trees, community herb plots and an impressive compost program, with 90 percent of the garden’s scraps being composted.” Plus, beehives and teaching plots. Events throughout the year get gardeners and friends together to show off their plots and learn from one another.

The Urban Farm Community Garden
10200 Smith Rd
Denver, Colorado 80239
(303) 307-9332
theurbanfarm.org

The Urban Farm at Stapleton is a working farm that provides experience to young people, through both animal and land care. The farm’s mission is to “inspire excitement for learning while fostering personal confidence, resilience, teamwork, and real-world problem solving skills.” After opening in 1993, The Urban Farm has grown to become a popular place for youth to gain a hands-on education that they wouldn’t find anywhere else. The community garden on the property will allow you to lease a plot for a year — plots are open to the public and you can plant anything you can dream of.

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UrbiCulture Community Farms
2861 West 52nd Avenue
Denver, CO 80221
www.ucfarms.org

UrbiCulture is “a multi-plot farm committed to providing food to people of all income levels by sustainably growing affordable, local food in the Denver metro area. We engage our community by educating our youth and neighbors on growing food and promoting healthy, active lifestyles, beautifying our neighborhoods with edible landscapes, and lessening the distance from farm to plate.” UrbiCulture receives plots of lands as donations, then cultivates that land to create some delicious food that is then re-distributed throughout the community. Join these gardens for a chance to give back to your town – there are plenty of plots situated throughout the city.

West Washington Park Community Garden
201 Grant Street
Denver, CO 80203
dug.org

Established in 1979, this garden is “dedicated to sustainable organic gardening, education, and community.” Seventy-five plots are offered every year and there are currently over 100 gardeners participating. Public events take place throughout the year to introduce visitors to the garden and educate the public on basic gardening skills. Whether you’re a new or seasoned gardener, you’ll love tending your own plot here.

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Jennifer Eberhart is a writer, reader, crafter, traveler and New Yorker. She works in midtown New York City for non-profit organizations. Her degrees are in communication studies and art history.You can contact Jennifer on Twitter at @egyptologist. Her work can be found at Examiner.com.

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