The Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative ArtThe Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Art (credit: CBS)
Sri-Lankan-British artist and designer Cecil Balmond once said, “The abstract has no emotional content … the abstract is more powerful the more abstract it is.” Abstract art plays with the imagination and can incorporate numerous layers of symbolism in any given piece. Tracing its lineage back to 19th-century Romanticism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and Expressionism, abstract art really spread its wings in the 20th century. Enjoy the beauty of abstract art at these exhibits in Denver.
Clyfford Still Museum
1250 Bannock St.
Denver, CO 80204
(720) 354-4880
www.clyffordstillmuseum.org

Running through Sept. 13, the exhibit “Clyfford Still: The Colville Reservation and Beyond, 1934-1939” depicts the world-renowned artist’s progression towards Abstract Expressionism. Still’s work featured in this exhibit are from his years as a faculty member at Washington State College, where he co-founded State College Summer Art Colony on Washington’s Colville Reservation. The exhibit has 30 original works on paper and eight oil-on-canvas compositions with accompanying photographs and sketches, and other pieces of his work. The museum opens at 10 a.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and is open until 8 p.m. on Fridays and 5 p.m. the rest of the week.

Denver Art Museum
100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway
Denver, CO 80204
(720) 865-5000
www.denverartmuseum.org

The Cubism movement of the early 20th century played a crucial role in the development of abstract art. On exhibit through January 2017, “Fracture: Cubism & After” captures the roots of abstract art. For art history lovers, the exhibit at the Denver Art Museum is a great way to learn more about the history of abstract art. Open every day at 10 a.m., with free days scattered throughout the year, do not miss this important exhibit at DAM.

Artists On Santa Fe
747 Santa Fe Drive
Denver, CO 80204
(303) 573-5903
www.aosf.squarespace.com

Artists on Santa Fe (AOSF) is a gallery with more than 30 artists’ work on display in the trendy Santa Fe Arts District of Denver. Currently, Denver-based abstract artist, Susan Helbig, has a collection of her paintings and drawings on displays at (AOSF). Helbig uses a variety of media in her work. In March 2011, 11 of her pieces were purchased and installed in the 2011 HGTV Green Home, located in Denver’s Stapleton neighborhood.

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Sandra Phillips Gallery
420 W. 12th Ave.
Denver, CO 80204
(303) 573-5969
www.thesandraphillipsgallery.com

Numerous abstract paintings from artist Ania Gola-Kumor are currently on exhibit at this gallery in the Santa Fe Arts District. Titled “Summer Remix,” a number of pieces from this exhibit have already been sold. Originally from Warsaw, Poland, Gola-Kumor is also a faculty member at the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design. Last year, Westword awarded Gola-Kumor’s “Moving Paint” exhibit as the best solo gallery show of 2014.

Kirkland Museum Of Fine & Decorative Art
1311 Pearl St.
Denver, CO 80203
(303) 832-8576
www.kirklandmuseum.org

Born in Ohio, artist Vance Kirkland lived in Denver from 1929 until he passed away in 1981. Kirkland’s fourth painting period during his illustrious career focused on abstract expressionism from 1950 to 1964. This quaint museum is the oldest commercial art building in Denver, and houses a collection of eight abstract expressionist paintings by Kirkland. Artists such as Jackson Pollock, Charles Russell, Georgia O’Keeffe, Thomas Hart Benton, Charles Burchfield, N. C. Wyeth and Grant Wood used the building as a living and gallery space, making this iconic spot a Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios, a program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Related: Top Exhibits For Kids In Denver

A Denver native, Alli Andress has been a writer for over a decade. Over the course of her career, Andress has written about topics ranging from indie music, animals, health issues and the best of the Mile High City. Her work can be found on Examiner.com

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