By Spencer Wilson

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. (CBS4) – A nurse in Colorado’s high country had just been trained on how to deal with saving a baby’s life just a week before she put her knowledge to practice. Jessica Little said her confidence in the moment was absolute.

Little works with Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs.

(credit: CBS)

“I ran back to the bedside and found the pediatrician and nurse that were on resuscitating a baby and I jumped in,” Little explained.

What to do next to save the baby was fresh in her mind because she had just finished training with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in Aspen on the same medical emergency.

Some mountain hospitals, while full of qualified medical professionals, don’t always have the resources cities, like Denver, have.

That’s why larger medical groups help train staff.

(credit: CBS)

“It’s harder for more rural facilities when they don’t have the patient volumes and things that start to keep up on their skills,” Catherine Steinbach-Payne explained.

She works as a clinical education specialist for our outreach team at Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children. She’s the one who was teaching Little the week before she put her training into action.

Steinbach-Payne told CBS4’s Spencer Wilson it’s because of the gap in resources they are focusing on helping train medical providers with the latest techniques and improve care.

Little said that day had a happy ending, the baby was flown to a Denver hospital and was able to make a recovery and go home with their family eventually. She said it was all a part of a day in her life, helped by her team at Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs.

“I don’t think I would use the word hero. I was just a part of a team that we did our job and we did it to the best of our ability.”

Spencer Wilson