By Jack Lowenstein

(CBS4) – Colorado Parks and Wildlife shared impressive video of a mountain lion recently. In the clip that was shared, a mountain lion is seen hopping a fence. CPW says, for reference, the gates it jumped over are both 4-feet wide, giving you an idea of the big cat’s size and strength. Adult mountain lions can grow to more than 6-feet long.

According to CPW’s website, “Mountain lions are generally calm, quiet, and elusive. They tend to live in remote, primitive country with plentiful deer and adequate cover. Such conditions exist in mountain subdivisions, urban fringes, and open spaces. Recently, the number of mountain lion/human interactions has increased.”

CPW says the increase is likely due to a variety of reasons:

  • ​More people moving into lion habitat
  • Increase in deer populations and density
  • Presumed increase in lion numbers and expanded range
  • More people using hiking and running trails in lion habitat
  • A greater awareness of the presence of lions

CPW says mountain lion sightings in the wild are rare, as are mountain lion attacks on people. But CPW does have tips in case you experience an encounter.

CPW Tips For A Mountain Lion Encounter

    • Remember: Every situation is different with respect to the lion, the terrain, the people, and their activity
    • Go in groups when you walk or hike in mountain lion country, and make plenty of noise to reduce your chances of surprising a lion. A sturdy walking stick is a good idea; it can be used to ward off a lion. Make sure children are close to you and within your sight at all times. Talk with children about lions and teach them what to do if they meet one
    • Do not approach a lion, especially one that is feeding or with kittens. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape
    • Stay calm when you come upon a lion. Talk calmly and firmly to it. Move slowly
    • Stop or back away slowly, if you can do it safely. Running may stimulate a lion’s instinct to chase and attack. Face the lion and stand upright
    • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you’re wearing one. If you have small children with you, protect them by picking them up so they won’t panic and run
    • If the lion behaves aggressively, throw stones, branches or whatever you can get your hands on without crouching down or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly. What you want to do is convince the lion you are not prey and that you may in fact be a danger to the lion
    • Fight back if a lion attacks you. Lions have been driven away by prey that fights back. People have fought back with rocks, sticks, caps or jackets, garden tools and their bare hands successfully. Remain standing or try to get back up

Visit Colorado Parks & Wildlife’s web page on mountain lions for more tips and further information about the species in Colorado.

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Jack Lowenstein