By Rick Sallinger

DENVER (CBS4)– The scene is familiar outside a Planned Parenthood Clinic. The protest signs are the same, but now the ground has suddenly shifted with abortions nearly outlawed in Texas.

(credit: CBS)

Bill Merritt, an anti-abortion protester told CBS4, “We’re obviously celebrating that decision given that it will save the lives of hundreds if not thousands of babies.”

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The Texas law, allowed to stand in a decision Thursday by the U.S. Supreme Court, bans abortions once medical professionals can detect cardiac activity, typically around six weeks. In a highly unusual twist, enforcement will be done by private citizens who can sue anyone they believe is violating the law.

At Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains, the clinic is preparing for an influx of women from Texas traveling out of state to terminate their pregnancies.

Dr. Kirstina Tocce, Planned Parenthood Rocky Mountains Vice President and Medical Director said, “We will handle as many patients as we can with our current infrastructure and looking forward to the future because this is a long-term issue that we are facing.”

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(credit: CBS)

Last year, Colorado voters defeated Proposition 115 which would have banned abortions after 22 weeks into a pregnancy. But given what has happened in Texas, Dr. Tocce fears that one day, abortion may become outlawed here, too.

“It’s absolutely a reality it can happen in any state. It can happen here,” she said.

In Mississippi, an abortion law is set to come before the U.S. Supreme court that could do away with Roe vs. Wade which guaranteed the right to abortion in America.

The protester, Merritt, would like that, “I hope that would happen all over the United States. I think it’s a great decision and hopefully, it will give women time to reconsider what they are doing and keep their babies.”

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In the meantime, they meet all who enter this clinic with a discussion and a flyer. Some stop and listen while others pass right on by.

Rick Sallinger