By Logan Smith

UPDATE: Boil Water Advisory Issued Following Water Pump Failure In Castle Pines

CASTLE PINES, Colo. (CBS4) – The water provider for the City of Castle Pines west of Interstate 25 suffered an equipment failure and is asking all commercial and residential customers to conserve water until further notice.

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The request specifically asks they completely eliminate any outdoor irrigation.

Ken Smith, spokesman for the Castle Pines North Metropolitan District, told CBS4 the district has already shut off irrigation to the area’s parks, trails and open space that it provides water for.

“We’re are leading by example,” Smith said.

File photo. (credit: CBS)

Residents woke up Wednesday morning to declining water service or none at all. While some lower-elevation customers may see a slow return of water pressure this afternoon, Smith said those customers on higher ground may have low water pressure probably throughout this afternoon, in the worst case, perhaps until early Thursday morning.

Three pumps in interconnect pipeline pump station “shorted out” despite built-in redundancies, Smith described. One of the three has been brought back online, but it is the smallest pump of the three.

 

File photo of Chatfield Reservoir. (credit: CBS)

The district serves 3,500 customers in the city and areas immediately to the north (a different entity serves Castle Pines Village to the south). Ten thousand live within the district, according to its website.

Smith said the district owns renewable rights to water that originates in the Mosquito Range near Alma, Colorado, flows to the Front Range in the South Platte to Chatfield Reservoir, and is treated by the Centennial Sanitation District that serves Highlands Ranch.

The interconnect station is point where the district receives CSD’s water and begins its distribution to the district system.

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CPNMD sent out the following statement to its customers mid-afternoon Wednesday:

Dear Castle Pines North Metro District Neighbors:

Thank you for your patience and understanding as we work to rectify temporary water service issues.

We are dealing with two separate problems:

First, the chlorine injector stopped working in our water treatment plant resulting in an automatic system shut-down. We ordered replacement parts weeks ago, but those parts have not yet arrived due to supply chain issues. Our backup water supply comes from Chatfield Reservoir, through Centennial Water & Sanitation District’s water treatment plant, through CPNMD’s interconnect pipeline, and into CPNMD’s distribution system.

That leads us to the second issue: For reasons we don’t yet fully understand, all three water pumps at CPNMD’s interconnect pipeline pump station shorted out.

Because the smallest of three water pumps is back up and running, residents in lower elevations now have water service, albeit with slightly lower-than-normal water pressure. Until we complete repairs on the other two pumps, residents at higher elevations in CPNMD may continue to experience extremely low water pressure.

As we continue our repair work, WE RESPECTFULLY ASK ALL RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL CUSTOMERS TO PLEASE DISCONTINUE ALL OUTDOOR IRRIGATION AND OTHERWISE CONSERVE WATER UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. To lead by example, we have temporarily shut off irrigation to all CPNMD parks, trails, and open space areas.

We will notify you via broadcast email and our website homepage at www.cpnmd.org when we have something substantive to report. In the meantime, please sign up for email updates! Click here to UPDATE MY CONTACT INFO and submit the brief online form.

Special thanks to Parker Water & Sanitation District staff and Centennial Water & Sanitation District staff for contributing their time and expertise in helping us troubleshoot.

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Most importantly, thank you for your patience as we work to restore normal water service.

 

Logan Smith