By Chris Spears

DENVER (CBS4) – You can draw a line down the middle of Colorado when it comes to talking about the drought. To the left conditions remain very serious with widespread extreme to exceptional drought. The old saying “pray for rain” is a part of daily life.

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Meanwhile to the right of that line we’re not out of the woods just yet, but for many locations, conditions have gradually improved since February after three consecutive months of cooler and wetter than normal weather. The last time Denver saw three months in a row with above normal precipitation was May, June and July of 2019.

DENVER STATS SINCE FEBRUARY

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  • February’s average temperature was 7.1° below normal, precipitation was 0.43″ above normal
  • March’s average temperature was 1° below normal, precipitation was 2.88″ above normal
  • April’s average temperature was 1.7° below normal through the 29th, precipitation was 0.38″ above normal

GRAND JUNCTION STATS SINCE FEBRUARY

  • February’s average temperature was 0.1° above normal, precipitation was 0.22″ below normal
  • March’s average temperature was 0.2° below normal, precipitation was 0.39″ below normal
  • April’s average temperature was 0.6° above normal through the 29th, precipitation was 0.58″ below normal

 

Hope abounds as the extended forecast shows promise of yet another soggy storm system in store for parts of the state later in the weekend. The map below shows a model projection for potential moisture with the next storm arriving on Sunday. The blue and purple colors indicate the possibility for a large part of the state to see up to an inch beneficial moisture.

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For the lower elevations this chance will come in the form of rain. The storm should be cold enough to produce snow in the mountains with a mix possible for some elevations between 5,000 and 7,000 feet.

(source: CBS)

Chris Spears