DOUGLAS COUNTY, Colo. (CBS4) – A new exercise attraction in Colorado is opening up for the holiday weekend. The Rueter-Hess Incline Challenge near Parker offers people a chance to gain quick elevation on a lollipop-shaped trail.

(credit: CBS)

“It’s the first phase of a 15-mile trail system. So right now if you do a loop here it’s about 1.3 miles,” said Ron Redd with the Parker Water and Sanitation District. “From the parking lot you have to walk almost half a mile to this spot and then you climb about 135 steps. That elevation change is about 230 feet.”

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The trail construction is decades in the making after a bond was passed to fund the Rueter-Hess Reservoir. The incline is expected to eventually be connected to miles of trails throughout Douglas County. For now, it’s a new outdoor amenity for people looking to get outside and get their heart rate up.

“I wanted to get here before the crowds and it’s a beautiful day. I like a good workout the weather is great,” said Heather Ryan, who said she could see her house from the top of the incline.

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The view at the top is picturesque. From Pikes Peak to Longs Peak and every peak in-between including the Tech Center and Denver skylines.

As the finishing touches were put on the trail, people started showing up before the official opening on Thanksgiving.

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“It’s been a tough year, a lot of people have been locked down so it seen kind a soft opening, we’ve had people out here every day for about the past week,” Redd said.

(credit: CBS)

It’s not the lung-busting incline like Manitou, more like the Challenge Hill in Castle Rock which usually sees about 1,000 people a day.

LINK: Rueter-Hess Incline Challenge

Redd says the construction won’t be complete until signs honoring the history and heritage of the area are built. When the Dam was under construction Cheyenne and Arapaho villages dating back 11,000 years were found. The trail will have plaques for people to read about that history of the site.

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“So as you walk through here you’ll be able to read about their history,” Redd said. “It’s just a nice amenity to be able to bring to the community.”

Jeff Todd