DENVER (AP) – A Colorado law aimed at protecting workers and students from discrimination against race-based hair traits went into effect Monday. The law, also known as the “CROWN Act” was passed by lawmakers in March and aims to prevent hair-related discrimination in public education, employment practices, housing, public accommodations and advertising.

It is one of several social justice-based policies enacted by state legislatures in response to emerging conversations and protests across the U.S. calling for racial justice and reform.

The Colorado law also redefines the characteristics of discrimination to include “hairtexture, hairtype, or a protective hairstyle that is commonly or historically associated with race.

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Comments
  1. “The Colorado law also redefines the characteristics of discrimination to include “hairtexture [sic], hairtype [sic], or a protective hairstyle that is commonly or historically associated with race.” — I wouldn’t be surprised; the Colorado General Assembly is illiterate. Colorado just doesn’t get compound words; usually, people are decomposing them inappropriately, but the General Assembly just invented two new ones. As to the substance of the bill, there is none (which is the measure of the General Assembly’s commitment to social justice).

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