LAKEWOOD, Colo. (CBS4) –  As students across Colorado adjust to learning from home, CBS4 and its partners, Colorado School of Mines and PDC Energy, feel it’s important to continue to recognize those high school students who are excelling in science, technology, engineering, and math — STEM.

(credit CBS)

Rosie Gavin is getting used to remote learning.

“I don’t think it’s great, but I understand the reasoning behind it,” she said about schools having to close.

The Green Mountain High School sophomore misses being in her honors classes, including biology, computer science and math.

“I’ve always been kind of interested in the science-based studies,” Gavin told CBS4.

(credit CBS)

Geometry In Construction is the class she misses the most.

“It was a math class, as well as, like a construction class,” Gavin said.

The students learn geometry while building a house.

“It was pretty amazing, because we started the year with no construction knowledge, and at the end of the year, we had a whole house in our parking lot,” Rosie explained. “We built it from the floor up. It fell over twice, and it’s just been a journey.”

(credit Rosie Gavin)

Gavin took Geometry In Construction last year, this year she’s a teacher’s assistant for the class.

“We became a lot like a family. We would really go out and build on the house, and we’d have a lot of fun doing that,” she said.

Gavin has worked hard throughout her school career, all while overcoming hearing loss.

“I just have accommodations that make sense, and they work in certain places, but not in others,” she said.

(credit CBS)

She got a Cochlear Implant on her left ear when she was 10. The kind of technology that can peak a girl’s interest in science.

“I think it’s definitely grown my interest, because it’s definitely interesting to know how this works…how I can hear.”

For now Gavin works from home, wondering when she’ll be able to get back to class.

“It’s been kind of a confusing time, just like, ‘Okay, what are we going to do now?’” Gavin said.

LINK: Nominate a Future Leaders candidate.

You can nominate a high school student who’s excelling in the STEM fields for a Future’s Leaders award. The award comes with $1,000 and a profile on CBS4.

Comments

Leave a Reply