By Dominic Garcia

AURORA, Colo. (CBS4) – To say that 6-year-old Mac Breit is energetic would be an understatement. When he’s not running around, he’s hitting the slopes.

“My favorite one is a black with powder,” he told CBS4’s Dominic Garcia.

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(credit: Breit family)

But five years ago, his mom had one of those feelings only a mother could have.

“He never fussed, he never cried, and he was just uncomfortable. I knew something was wrong,” said Erin Campbell.

His parents took him to Children’s Hospital Colorado where doctors performed an ultrasound and found a mass that was blocking the exit of his bladder – and forcing urine to back up into his kidneys.

Breit family (credit: CBS)

Mac was diagnosed with a rare, soft tissue cancer known as Rhabdomyosarcoma. Dr. Nick Cost and Dr. Carrye Cost – a husband and wife team – worked hard to find a solution that would save Mac’s life while limiting the harmful consequences that can come with any cancer treatment. They agreed that a combination of radiation and chemo therapy would be a better option than surgery.

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“For Mac, radiation was a better option because it’s allowed him to preserve all of his normal organ function and allowed him to be the amazing active kid you see today,” said Carrye.

During treatment, both Mac’s doctors and parents say it was he who inspired them.

(credit: CBS)

“If he’s walking into this hospital with a smile on his face, giving all his doctors hugs and high fives, and ready to face this with such a remarkably positive attitude… so are we,” Erin told CBS4’s Dominic Garcia.

Mac is now in remission and is back on the ski slopes. He also has a message for anyone affected by cancer.

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“Keep trying until you get through,” he told CBS4.

Dominic Garcia