By Tori Mason

DENVER (CBS4) – Mothers who have lost a child spend the rest of their lives in mourning, but a grieving mother with no answers, spends the rest of her life on a mission. Susanne Price is still searching for her son’s killer, 24 years after his death.

(credit: Denver Police Department)

Andre Price Jr. was murdered in 1995. The Denver Police Department posted a new plea recently, hoping that after more than two decades, someone will be moved to come forward with information.

(credit: CBS)

“They shot him down like a dog. I never thought my son’s life would be taken away like that. Not in a million years,” said Andre’s mother Susanne Price.

(credit: CBS)

Andre was 21 years old when he was shot and killed in the 5500 block of Yuba Way on June 27, 1995. The daughter he left behind is now a mother, and Andre’s mother won’t rest until his killer is caught.

(credit: CBS)

“I went knocking on doors. I went everywhere. I went to people’s houses,” said Price, “I called the police department and I asked if they needed some help. If they can’t solve my son’s murder, maybe I can.”

(credit: CBS)

When Price retires at the end of the year, she plans to spend the majority of her time investigating the death of her son. According to Denver police, her diligence is what keeps this cold case from freezing.

(credit: CBS)

“This case landed on my desk because the mom is keeping it very much alive. She’s actively invested in trying to find out who’s responsible for the death of her son,” said Detective Kari Johnson of DPD’s Cold Case Investigative Unit.

(credit: CBS)

Denver Police says advances in technology will allow them to retest some evidence, but the missing piece of this puzzle might not be in a lab.

(credit: Denver Police Department)

“The suspects have never been identified and they’ve never been interviewed. That’s what we’re trying to generate out of this, someone who can ID those suspects for us,” said Johnson.

(credit: CBS)

Andre’s family is hoping someone with information will find the courage to come forward, courage no one has shown for more than two decades.

“I think there’s a lot more people that know what happened. They know the truth or at least part of the truth,” said Shirley Anderson, the grandmother of Andre’s daughter, “Either they’re afraid or they just don’t care.”

(credit: Denver Police Department)

As every day passes, the case grows colder and the Andre’s family becomes more frustrated. They are looking for peace, closure, and above all, justice.

There’s currently a $2,000 reward for information that could lead to an arrest. Those with any knowledge of Andre’s death should call Metro Denver Crimestoppers 720-913-STOP (7867)

Tori Mason

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