By Tori Mason

DENVER (CBS4)– Most shoppers put their groceries in a cart, but they usually leave those carts at the store. People who rely on public transit to run errands often bring their own cart and must take it with them wherever they go.

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“They cost about $40,” said Lesa Webb, “I call them senior carts. They fold up and you use them to get groceries and go to food banks. They’re very convenient.”

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Webb uses a personal cart to bring her groceries home from Metro Caring’s food bank. Once a month she’ll walk across the street to a bus stop, then take the bus to a light rail that brings her close to home.

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“Before I started using these carts, I was carrying four bags in each hand!” said Webb. “I see people struggling with bags a lot. That’s very stressful; Carrying bags, standing at the bus stop and hopping on the bus.”

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Her cart makes the trip easier, but RTD says they’re not ideal on public transit. Carts can block the aisle and make it difficult for people in wheelchairs to get through.

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Webb left Metro Caring with 62 pounds of groceries Thursday. Carrying them in bags onto the bus was not an option. Even if she had the strength, there was nowhere to keep them contained.

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Metro Caring recognizes the problems people face getting food home via public transit. They invited RTD on a tour of their facility Thursday to begin a conversation toward change.

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During the tour, RTD listened to the issues many people like Webb are facing. RTD says they’ll evaluate the feasibility of storage concerns when they expand their fleet in the future.

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RTD also says they take communities that benefit from the services Metro Caring offers into consideration when planning routes and stops.

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To offer additional support, RTD plans to hold a hiring fair at Metro Caring to give customers easier access to job opportunities.

Tori Mason

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