By Brian Maass

DENVER (CBS4) – CBS4 has learned that seven Denver sheriff deputies involved in the jail death of Michael Marshall have been told to appear Wednesday morning to apparently learn if they will be disciplined in the case.

Two sources familiar with the case told CBS4 the deputies and sheriff department commanders were told to appear Wednesday. The deputies believe they will learn what, if any discipline, they will face in the Marshall case.

Image from the Michael Marshall encounter (credit: Denver Sheriff Daepartment)

Marshall was a Denver jail inmate who died in 2015. The Denver coroner ruled Marshall’s death a homicide, noting he was physically restrained by deputies during a psychotic episode at the jail.

Former Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey ruled none of the deputies involved would be subject to criminal charges as he found their actions justified.

Image from the Michael Marshall encounter (credit: Denver Sheriff Daepartment)

Marshall had been arrested at a Denver motel for trespassing and disturbing the peace. After being jailed at the downtown Denver Detention Center, Marshall got into a confrontation with Denver deputies who said he acted erratically.

Marshall collapsed during the altercation and died 10 days later after he was removed from life support.

Image from the Michael Marshall encounter (credit: Denver Sheriff Daepartment)

The deputies involved in the controversial case received what are known as pre- disciplinary letters in March, notifying them they may have violated department rules, such as using unnecessary force, careless handling of an inmate, and other rule violations.

Some supervisors were notified they faced potential discipline for failing to supervise deputies.

Image from the Michael Marshall encounter (credit: Denver Sheriff Daepartment)

In recent days, the deputies were ordered to appear Wednesday in connection with the case. Denver’s manager of safety decides disciplinary measures in such cases.

A spokesperson for the Manager of Safety’s Office did not answer her phone Tuesday evening or immediately return a call from CBS4.

If they are disciplined Wednesday, the deputies could face a range of punishment from a reprimand up to termination. They also have the right to appeal discipline they receive.

CBS4 Investigator Brian Maass has been with the station more than 30 years uncovering waste, fraud and corruption. Follow him on Twitter @Briancbs4.

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