Editor’s Note: CBS4 asked Sen. Cory Gardner’s office for evidence of out-of-state paid protesters calling the office. Read CBS4’s report about his response.

DENVER (CBS4) – Coloradans are flooding the phone lines of Colorado’s elected officials after President Donald Trump took the Oath of Office.

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Sen. Cory Gardner talked to CBS4’s Political Specialist Shaun Boyd about the amount of calls his office is getting from people concerned about changes to everything ranging from health care to immigration.

Sen. Cory Gardner (credit: CBS)

Sen. Cory Gardner (credit: CBS)

Gardner said his office is getting so many calls and emails, his has staff assigned to do nothing except respond to them. In one night, his office received 3,000 voicemails. Many of them were from what Gardner calls paid protesters from other parts of the U.S.

When asked if this was what he expected one week into Trump’s administration, Gardner replied, “It’s just been a fire hose.”

US President Donald Trump signs an executive order to start the Mexico border wall project at the Department of Homeland Security facility in Washington, DC. (credit: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump signs an executive order to start the Mexico border wall project at the Department of Homeland Security facility in Washington, DC. (credit: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Gardner admits with the confirmation hearings, his committees have heard seven, and Executive Orders, Trump has signed 12, that it has been difficult to keep up with what’s happening in Washington, D.C.

“It just seems the second you turn your head one way to see what’s coming down that road, you have to turn your head that way to see what’s coming down that road,” said Gardner.

CBS4 Political Specialist Shaun Boyd interviews Sen. Cory Gardner (credit: CBS)

CBS4 Political Specialist Shaun Boyd interviews Sen. Cory Gardner (credit: CBS)

Some Coloradans are not happy with what they’re seeing on either road.

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Protesters gathered outside a conference where Gardner was speaking and demanded a meeting. This was after Gardner fielded 12,000 questions at a tele-town hall.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

“There were a number of questions from Pueblo, to Cortez and Durango, and on up to Grand Junction,” said Gardner.

Many of the questions were about health care.

When asked if there was a replacement for Obamacare, Gardner replied, “If you look at the ideas that have been put forward over the past several years by Republican legislators, and there have been many, some are more narrowly targeted to, say, a specific health savings account idea and others have been pretty significant and broad.”

 (credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

Gardner also says Congress will be methodical on immigration reform. He also says that Executive Action is not the way to do it.

“People shouldn’t be afraid, I don’t think, in this country. We should be proud. We should take pride in the differences of opinion in this country. But never use that or let fear interfere with making this country stronger or fighting for your viewpoints,” said Gardner.

Neil M. Gorsuch is sworn in to U.S. Court Of Appeals for the 10th Circuit on Nov. 20, 2006. (credit: Denver Post / Getty Images Photo By John Prieto)

Neil M. Gorsuch is sworn in to U.S. Court Of Appeals for the 10th Circuit on Nov. 20, 2006. (credit: Denver Post / Getty Images Photo By John Prieto)

Constituents are also weighing in on the next Supreme Court justice. Colorado Judge Neil Gorsuch is on Trump’s shortlist.

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Gardner says it’s a great opportunity for Colorado to have a Western voice on the court to understand certain issues like water rights.