DENVER (CBS4) – Broncos linebacker Brandon Marshall is continuing to make his impact felt in the community following his highly publicized decision to kneel during the national anthem before several Broncos games this season.

Marshall and two teammates joined Denver Police Chief Robert White at Mile High Station on Monday night to show support to fathers in the correctional system. The appearance follows an hour-long meeting between White and Marshall in September.

White came away from the meeting impressed with Marshall’s character but didn’t say whether he agreed with the decision to kneel.

Brandon Marshall (credit: CBS)

Brandon Marshall (credit: CBS)

Monday’s event was called Christmas to Remember and it was hosted by Denver Dream Center. It gave the dads a chance to spend time with their families during the holiday season.

“I think it’s important for these young men that have been in this system or are out of this system or are in some kind of conversionary status to know that ‘Never give up.’ That they have the support from the mayor and his admistration, certainly that includes me. And they have support from other people in their community and some well named individuals such as Sylvester (Williams) and Brandon,” White said.

White said he asked Marshall in September what he was going to do after he stopped kneeling.

Brandon Marshall (credit: CBS)

Sylvester Williams, left, Brandon Marshall, center, and Denver Police Chief Robert White, right (credit: CBS)

“He said ‘Hey, I’m going to volunteer some time, I’m going to volunteer some money. And he’s done just that,” White said.

Marshall told DenverBroncos.com he “definitely wants to get in the community more” with White.

“I thought it was a great cause — to bring families together for the holidays, families that are maybe having some trouble, whether (the dad) is on probation or whatever the case may be, so I thought it was huge,” Marshall said in a video posted on his team’s site.

Broncos defensive lineman Sylvester Williams and wide receiver Jordan Norwood also made appearances at the event.

On its website, Denver Dream Center describes its mission as “to reconnect people who have been isolated by poverty, substance abuse, gangs, imprisonment, homelessness, abuse and neglect to God and to a community of support to meet their physical and spiritual needs, and to help them develop a support system that will encourage them to make positive, long-term, God-honoring changes in their lives.”

 

 

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