(CBS4) – A Colorado mother who has fought for allowing prescribed medical marijuana in schools says she’s disappointed by the Drug Enforcement Administration’s decision to keep marijuana on its list of the most dangerous drugs.

The federal agency announced its decision on Thursday, and Stacey Linn told CBS4 later in the day that without lowering marijuana’s scheduling from its Schedule I class, new research into the benefits of cannabis will be stymied.

CBS4's Stan Bush interviews Stacey Linn (credit: CBS)

CBS4’s Stan Bush interviews Stacey Linn (credit: CBS)

“What we really want is no schedule,” Linn said. “At least taking it to a Schedule II would have made it not such a federal crime and would have opened up a whole lot of avenues for patients and everyone else too.”

Earlier this year, Linn worked with state lawmakers to pass a new law that makes it easier for her son to take his medically perscribed marijuana at school. Linn says even with standing state laws, the DEA decision will make life for her son Jack harder.

Gov. John Hickenlooper signs the medical marijuana in schools bill into law (credit: CBS)

Stacey Linn raises her hand in celebration with her son as Gov. John Hickenlooper signs the first medical marijuana in schools bill into law in 2015. A second state law strengthening the original was signed on June 2016. (credit: CBS)

“Until that ends, we’re going to keep facing that stigma and we’re going to keep facing the hardship of finding lifesaving medicine. Proven, lifesaving medicine,” Linn said.

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Both presidential campaigns say if they are elected, they won’t make any effort to change Colorado’s legal pot laws. On Thursday, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton said she favors lowering marijuana to a Schedule II narcotic.

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