Veterans Who ‘Died Namelessly’ Honored With Wreath Project

By Tom Mustin

DENVER (CBS4) – A Colorado man is hoping generous fellow Coloradans will step up to honor our veterans.

David Bolser is behind a project to place honorary wreaths on all 106,000 graves at Fort Logan National Cemetery in Denver. Last year, Bolser raised enough money to place wreaths on 7,000 graves at Fort Logan.

cemetery wreaths 6pkg transfer frame 0 Veterans Who Died Namelessly Honored With Wreath Project

(credit: CBS)

This year he wants to place wreaths on the gravesites of all the veterans buried at the cemetery.

He has until Nov. 26 to reach his goal. He’s hoping enough people will come together to make his dream a reality.

SHARE YOUR STORY: Share A Together 4 Colorado Story Idea With CBS4

The sea of graves at Fort Logan National Cemetery tells the story of more than 100,000 American heroes.

cemetery wreaths 6pkg transfer frame 535 Veterans Who Died Namelessly Honored With Wreath Project

(credit: Fort Logan Honor website)

“Everything we do we owe to them. Everything,” David Bolser told CBS4’s Tom Mustin.

Bolser is the CEO of the Colorado nonprofit group Senior Veterans Inc.

He’s working with another nonprofit to place the wreaths on each gravesite by Dec. 16, which is National “Wreaths Across America Day.”

“All of the freedoms we have every day are all because of the 1 percent that are buried out here in the 240 acres at Fort Logan,” said Bolser.

cemetery wreaths 6pkg transfer frame 1677 Veterans Who Died Namelessly Honored With Wreath Project

(credit: CBS)

The wreaths are made in Maine and cost $15 apiece. They have to be ordered by Nov. 26. Bolser is hoping Coloradans will step up with donations to cover the cost.

“There’s a different name on every gravestone, but the names on every wreath are all the same — it’s grateful Americans,” said Bolser.

Among the 106,000 people buried at Fort Logan is Lt. Colonel Edward Maloney, a veteran of World War II and the Korean War.

His two sons followed in their father’s footsteps and also served in the military. They applaud Bolser’s wreath project.

cemetery wreaths 6pkg transfer frame 148 Veterans Who Died Namelessly Honored With Wreath Project

(credit: CBS)

“Most of them died namelessly and not ceremoniously. It’s good to be remembered by the nation they served to protect,” said Lt. Col. Rick Maloney, a West Point graduate and 20 year Army veteran.

His brother, Air Force Lt. Col. Jim Maloney, agrees.

“I think it’s important to remember the past and remember their service,” he said.

The brothers say a $15 donation is a small price to pay to honor the priceless sacrifice of brave Coloradans who fought for our freedom far from home.

“Bravo to the project. It’s very ambitious, but a wonderful thing to support,” said Maloney.

LINK: Fort Logan Honor Wreath Project

Tom Mustin is CBS4’s Weekend Anchor. He has been with CBS4 since 2002, and is always looking for great story ideas. Connect with Tom on Facebook or follow him on Twitter @TomCBS4.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More From CBS Denver

FANTASY FOOTBALL
Together 4 Colorado
CBS4 INVESTIGATES

Watch & Listen LIVE