As Wildfire Battles Continue, Remote Colorado Community Says ‘Thanks’

By Matt Kroschel

RANGELY, Colo. (CBS4) – Thank you.

That’s what residents in a remote part of northwestern Colorado are saying to the nearly 200 firefighters who are arriving to fight multiple wildfires in the area.

dead dog fire As Wildfire Battles Continue, Remote Colorado Community Says Thanks

Dead Dog Fire (credit: CBS)

“We could not be more grateful for all of the support people coming from all over to help our rural town. It’s overwhelming,” Rangely resident Sharma Vaughn told CBS4 Tuesday evening.

An incident command team arrived and took over command of the nearly 18,000 acre Dead Dog Fire burning about 10 miles north of the town. They hosted a community meeting Tuesday evening more than 100 residents showed up to to hear how the fight is going.

At last check, the fire is 10 percent contained.

The 992 acre Hunter Fire is now 70 percent contained. It is burning about 28 miles southwest of Meeker. Crews hope to have that contained Wednesday and then shift resources on the larger Dead Dog Fire.

Aircraft continued to attack the flames Tuesday.

A major Chevron Energy operation that had closed and evacuated workers as the Dead Dog Fire spread Monday was allowed to open again. That news has locals worried about jobs happy.

Wildfire Resources

– Visit CBSDenver.com’s Living With Wildfire section.

Wildfire Photo Galleries

– See images from the most destructive wildfires (Black Forest, Waldo Canyon, High Park and Fourmile), the deadliest (Storm King) and largest wildfire (Hayman) in Colorado history.

Matt Kroschel covers news throughout Colorado working from the CBS4 Mountain Newsroom. Send story ideas to mrkroschel@cbs.com and connect with him on Twitter @Matt_Kroschel.

Comments

One Comment

  1. Michael Corn says:

    Why should the taxpayers pay for these fires? Fire Departments should be paid for by property owners through their fire insurance. Fire Departments and fire suppression should be paid by the rich insurance companies, who have seats on fire district boards along with the public who lives in the area protected. Those people who live out in the middle of brush or trees should pay more. This goes for FEMA. There are hundreds of stories of FEMA paying fantastic sums out of our $20T debt.

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