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Snowpack Drops 2 Inches In 2 Days; 13 More Inches To Go

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Cache la Poudre River (credit: CBS)

Cache la Poudre River (credit: CBS)

Chris Spears By Chris Spears
CBS4 Meteorologist
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DENVER (CBS4) – Rivers and streams continue to rise across northern Colorado as the spring melt heats up.

One of the river basins with the highest concern has been the South Platte, largely due to the catastrophic floods that hit much of the area last September.

On Tuesday, May 27, the latest SNOTEL data showed there was still 15 inches of water left in the snowpack that remained in the South Platte basin.

SNOTEL data showing 15 inches of water content was left in the South Platte River basin's snowpack on May 27, 2014. (credit: NRCS)

SNOTEL data showing 15 inches of water content was left in the South Platte River basin’s snowpack on May 27, 2014. (credit: NRCS)

On Thursday, May 29, SNOWTEL data showed about 13 inches of water still remains.

SNOTEL data showing about 13 inches of water content was left in the South Platte River basin's snowpack on May 29, 2014. (credit: NRCS)

SNOTEL data showing about 13 inches of water content was left in the South Platte River basin’s snowpack on May 29, 2014. (credit: NRCS)

The good news is that we saw two inches melt in just two days!

The bad news is that caused a tremendous change in areas rivers, creeks and streams, and there is still a lot of water to melt and come down.

WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD?

It’s hard to say.

But given the fact we are now in the peak of thunderstorm season, and that the recent weather pattern has brought so much moisture into the state, plus the fact that its warm, it’s pretty safe to assume our rivers will stay high and fast for several days to come.

And not to instill a sense of fear, but given there is still so much water left to come down, until there is a light at the end of the tunnel, we should assume the worst may be yet to come.

With the weekend upon us, it’s now more important than ever to exercise extreme caution along all rivers, creeks and streams.

When out and about, especially in the high country or near waterways, keep an eye both to the sky, and the waters, for any sudden changes in the situation.

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