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Centennial Company Finds Breakthrough In Cancer Screening

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Terry Colip with Cell>Point talks with CBS4's Kathy Walsh (credit: CBS)

Terry Colip with Cell>Point talks with CBS4’s Kathy Walsh (credit: CBS)

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CENTENNIAL, Colo. (CBS4) – A company based in Centennial has developed a breakthrough in cancer screening. The technology is touted as better, and less expensive than the images and scans now used to detect cancer.

The developers say the new technology will change the way cancer is diagnosed. For patients it would eliminate the anguish of false positives and the months of uncertainty.

Emily Canova is a fit 40-something. She works at the University of Colorado Athletic Department. She’s also the mother of two. In November of last year she had a mammogram.

“They said, ‘We see something suspicious, let’s also get an ultrasound done,’ ” Canova said.

That led to an MRI, but no definitive diagnosis.

“We found some suspicious tissue, and then we also found a lesion on my sternum,” Canova said.

From November to June Canova had a CT scan, blood test, biopsy, bone scan, and mammogram, but the doctors didn’t find cancer. The total cost was about $15,000. Emily’s share was $3,000. It also took an emotional toll on her.

“It happens all the time,” Cell>Point founder Terry Colip said.

Cell>Point has developed what it calls EC-G, a cancer screening agent. It’s injected into a patient’s bloodstream. Colip says the chemical can light up a tumor on a SPECT camera, a device found in most hospitals.

“If there is no cancer you will see no image,” Colip said.

Colip says EC-G provides better accuracy, greater availability, lower cost than current scans, and more.

“The radiation dose is very, very, very low,” Colip said.

So the scan can be done again to see if the cancer treatment is working. Colip said so far they haven’t seen any downside.

EC-G is now in a phase three clinical study for lung cancer. It is also being studied for use in diagnosing patients with heart disease.

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