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Fallen DPD Officer Celena Hollis Honored With Bone Marrow Drive

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One potential bone marrow donor swabs his cheek for the National Bone Marrow Registry at Denver Police District Two Station on Friday (credit: CBS)

One potential bone marrow donor swabs his cheek for the National Bone Marrow Registry at Denver Police District Two Station on Friday (credit: CBS)

DENVER (CBS4)- One group hosted a special event on Friday to keep the memory of fallen Denver Police Officer Celena Hollis alive.

Hollis, 32, was shot and killed June 24 while trying to break up a fight in City Park during a Jazz in the Park concert.

The single mother had been organizing a bone marrow donor drive before she was killed. Now one group wants to make sure her vision is realized.

The event was 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday at Denver Police Department’s District Two Station located at 39th and Holly in Denver. More than 100 people registered for the national registry.

celena hollis Fallen DPD Officer Celena Hollis Honored With Bone Marrow Drive

Officer Celena Hollis (credit: Denver Police)

“We’re just making sure that we carry through on what it is she was so passionate about and this was one of the things that she was passionate about,” said Denver Black Police Officers’ Organization spokeswoman Becky Hale.

Hollis made it her mission to register bone marrow donors for Mark Jenkins, a National Guardsman Staff Sergeant living with Leukemia.

Since Hollis’ passing, police in Denver are working to continue her efforts to get people registered. Denver Police Chief Robert White signed up on Friday.

“I just think is shows their admiration for her and their understanding of learning that this is such an incredible way, just think about saving another human being’s life,” said Leukemia survivor William Buckley.

Buckley is living six years Leukemia-free thanks to a bone marrow donor. He attended the bone marrow drive to show his appreciation to everyone fulfilling Hollis’ mission.

“It’s incredible that she was so involved in the community and efforts like this that has nothing to do with police work,” said Buckley.

To register for the National Bone Marrow Registry list, all it takes is a simple swab to the cheek.

“I think the biggest misconception is that it’s hard to become a donor and it’s not. It literally takes five minutes,” said Bonfils Blood Center spokeswoman Dianna Hemphill.

Those who missed the bone marrow drive can get on the registry at any time at Bonfils Blood Center. Those donors especially in need are Black men.

RELATED LINK: bonfils.org

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